Christmas Ethics in Grade One

Grade One Audience

Without taking away from the stellar work that the other two groups in Philosophy 12 contributed to our Ethics’ unit endeavour to create teaching/learning materials for a younger audience (middle school on downwards), I wanted to share a recording I made of Iris, Megan, Greg, Zoe and Toren’s group’s presentation in a grade one classroom on Friday afternoon (the file is too big to post anywhere other than here on my site).

You can listen to the participatory magic the group brought to life in the way of a story, a singalong, and even some Christmas cookies if you like, by clicking the link below (sorry, I couldn’t manage to hyperlink the cookies).

Max’s Christmas Story┬áby Megan (story), Iris (song), Greg (song), Zoe (illustrations), Toren (editing/photoshop/cookies).

The other presentations (a cinematic interpretation of the ethics at work in the film, The Hunger Games, and a Choose Your Own Ethical Adventure Youtube series) will be available on the Philosophy blog shortly. Some of the lessons learned from the peer and self-assessment is posted here.

Solar Power Blues

An audio gem from Saturday’s campus fire at Sea to Sky this past weekend, Owl leads the TALONS in a audience-participation┬áversion of Solar Power Blues, which he explains in the clip.

Bringing the Campfire to #eci831

Digital Storytelling
Giulia Forsythe’s Digital Campfire

Tibetan song jam by Bryanjack

Last night I sat in on Alec CourosEC&I 831: Social Media and Open Education session with Richard Schwier, where the lively conversation centered around learning and collaborating in (online) communities and contained a rabid chat thread brimming with links and extensions on Richard’s points.

As is becoming customary in these sessions, Leslie Lindballe was thinking of sharing a song toward the end of the session, and we shot a few private chats back and forth plotting a digital campfire singalong of sorts. Having tried jamming in real time with friends over the #ds106radio airwaves on a number of different occasions, I shared a Google Doc with the lyrics of Sweet Cascadia‘s “Me & my Bike,” and performed the song (on my ukulele) with the hopes that people in the session might be able to sing along from home.

Following this little experiment in all things digitally Kumbaya, Leslie sang a Tibetan song (accompanied by her uke) that I recorded in real time by setting my phone to record while sitting on the counter next to my speakers, and playing along in the same room (I can hear Leslie, but she can’t hear me, making the moment where she announces, “I can hear Bryan soloing,” all the more magical).